June - July 2018: What We've Accomplished

Written by: 
Nick Smith

Infographic

We've really accomplished a lot in the first half of this year! Thank you everyone who continues to put in the time and energy to fight for liberty in San Francisco! It's an uphill battle, and sometimes it doesn't feel so rewarding, but it's important work that wouldn't happen without our amazing activists and volunteers.

So, take a few minutes to reflect on the first half of this year and ask yourself: how can we make the rest of the year even better??

meta_only

Keeping Out The Riff-Raff

Written by: 
Aubrey Freedman

With the Nimby’s and Yimby’s battling each other over land use rules in tackling The City’s and California’s housing problems, we wonder why so little is being said about another major cause of the high prices—urban growth boundaries (UGB).  UGB’s have been around for decades all along the west coast, so it should be no surprise that the highest cost of housing in the nation tends to be in California, Oregon, and Washington state. Boulder, Colorado has a UGB and not coincidentally very high housing costs too.

float_left

Divorce—San Francisco Style

Written by: 
Aubrey Freedman

Last weekend the LPSF hosted a booth at the San Francisco Pride 2018 Fair.  We’ve become a regular exhibitor (not literally!) at the fair for many years, and liberty-leaning folks always love to see us there each year with our brochures, posters, buttons, World’s Smallest Political Quiz, Spinning Wheel of Crazy San Francisco Laws, and other tricks of the outreach trade.  This year folks may have noticed that we were there under our own Libertarian Party of San Francisco banner, rather than Outright Libertarians, which we had used for the last 14 years. The general public probably didn’t even notice the subtle difference because to the average person, once you’ve seen one Libertarian, you’ve seen them all.

float_right

San Francisco, 2028– A Healthy City?

Written by: 
Starchild

San Francisco, 2028 – Under legislation passed by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, all city residents who don’t already have a SuperHealthySF chip implant will be required to obtain one by January 1.

After that date, persons not showing up on a Department of Public Health scan will lose various privileges, such as the ability to connect to the Internet via the civic network, the ability to use virtual reality programs and other services provided by the library, and the ability to enter parks and other facilities that require chip recognition for entry.

Visitors will be able to get temporary chips by applying and paying a fee at one of the DPH checkpoints at SFO, on the bridges, at the Convention & Visitors Bureau, or along the city’s southern border.

float_right