Libertarian Party of San Francisco |

FBI Investigates Proposition A’s Political Director

In July 2019, Gail Gilman became the Political Director of the Proposition A "Affordable Housing" Bond campaign. For the prior seventeen years she was the executive director of the Community Housing Partnership (CHP). Before that, she worked for Bridge Housing. Both stand to be the chief contract awardees of Proposition A bond proceeds. Gail Gilman is also a San Francisco Port Commissioner responsible for dishing out contracts from the 2018 Port Seawall Bond.

5 Practices For Being An Effective Libertarian Activist

     Here are a few insights I've found in my time as a libertarian (pro-freedom) activist which I consider valuable and thought I'd share in the hope that others may find them useful...

• If you find yourself debating or arguing with someone (in person, online, or wherever) whose stance in the conversation is more pro-freedom on the particular topic or issue being discussed than yours, change the topic or leave the conversation. If you want to debate that issue, go find another conversation in which the person or people you're debating are less pro-freedom on it than you are. In this way, you can ensure that your advocacy is on the side of freedom, not against it.

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Libertarian Solutions to the Housing Crisis: End Greenmailing

Housing affordability impacts all San Francisco residents. In our official opposition argument to Proposition E's "Affordable Housing" proposal, the Libertarian Party of San Francisco suggested reform of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) as an important to address the current housing crisis.

San Francisco Diary: Black Eggs, Black Ops, Tail of Two Headless Torsos, Broken Beams, Broken Dreams, and Don’t Forget the Lucky Dog!

SAN FRANCISCO ­– Passing the bustle and grime of Fifth street with its soot wafting down on the dingy Hall of Justice and its asbestos-ridden caves of crooks and cutthroats and where idling autos queue to sail past a plaque marking the end of the Eisenhower Interstate and Defense Highway System, one turns past a sketchy former SRO now unoccupied by residents but having something-to-do with a Carlisle Group affiliate called the Community Housing Partnership. I peered inside and did not see much housing, let alone community, so unfearingly I turned onto Clara street – more of a slot than a street by San Francisco standards. After all, before it was “South of Market,” it was “South of the Slot,” but it retained the Bay Windows characteristic of Oz.